Clifford May
Clifford May
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Resisting the longest hatred

May 27, 2015  •  The Washington Times

Robert S. Wistrich, who died suddenly last week, was considered the foremost scholar of anti-Semitism, which he called "the longest hatred," one that appears to be metastasizing in the current era.

Writing about Nazi anti-Semitism ruffles no feathers within academia and other elite circles. Mr. Wistrich, however, had been warning that "anti-Semitism has undergone a process of growing 'Islamicization,' linked to the terrorist holy war against Jews and other non-Muslims with its truly lethal consequences." This "new" anti-Semitism," he added, targets Israel, the only state with a Jewish majority: "the collective Jew."

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The summit that wasn't

May 20, 2015  •  The Washington Times

I'd venture to guess that most of what you heard about President Obama's summit last week was wrong. To start, it wasn't a "summit." That term, coined by Winston Churchill, implies a meeting of heads of government. However, the most important Arab leader invited by Mr. Obama, King Salman of Saudi Arabia, stayed home, as did the rulers of the United Arab Emirates and Oman. King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa of Bahrain decided his time could be spent more productively at the Royal Windsor Horse Show outside London.

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The broad shield of the First Amendment

May 13, 2015  •  The Washington Times

Rights are like muscles. If not exercised, they atrophy. Freedom of speech, a right guaranteed by the First Amendment, is the most fundamental of rights. Without it, how do you even defend your other rights?

Today, free speech is under assault — in many instances with assault weapons. I have long argued that this trend traces back to 1989 when Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, leader of Iran's Islamic revolution, issued a fatwa, or religious ruling, calling for the assassination of Salman Rushdie, whose novel, "The Satanic Verses," he considered insulting to Islam. In effect, he was proclaiming that Islamic law as he interpreted it henceforth must be obeyed not just in Iran, and not just by Muslims, but by everyone, everywhere.

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The 'suave' manner of a terrorist

May 6, 2015  •  The Washington Times

Tehran's largest cemetery, Behesht-e Zahra, contains the graves of thousands of Iranians killed in battle. There's also a polished stone monument bearing this inscription: "To the memory of two Muslim Lebanese youths who on the morning of Sunday October 23, 1983, in two simultaneous martyrdom operations, with trucks carrying explosives, attacked the headquarters of American occupiers (in South Beirut) and headquarters of French occupiers (in West Beirut) killing 241 American Marines and 48 French paratroopers. Their names we do not know, but we will continue their path."

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Recalling the lessons of Armenia

April 30, 2015  •  The Washington Times

Displayed outside the Turkish embassy in Washington last week was a large banner reading, "Armenian genocide is an imperialist lie." That claim might be amusing were the subject not so dreadful. The slaughter of hundreds of thousands of Armenians in 1915 was carried out by the Ottoman Empire. It was, therefore, by definition, an imperialist crime, one regarded by most experts as the first genocide of the 20th century. The notion that some other empire (which one?) has fabricated a slander against Turkey is ludicrous. Those who came up with that slogan must assume they are addressing a clueless audience.

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